Curating in Healthcare

While surfing the web for anything curation-related, I came across one of the most interesting sites I’ve seen so far: sisters Nancy O’Brien and Deb Andelt’s experienceinmotion.net. At the top of their home page reads “equipping you to curate meaningful experiences.” This confused me, I wasn’t sure where they were gonna go with this. Basically, what these two women do is attempt to strengthen healthcare organizations by strengthening the relationships in the work place, through a therapeutic and hippie chick kind of method. The sisters are both experts in a field that I did not know existed known as “customer and employee experience management.” The method they implement with the businesses that ask for their help is known as “strategic experience management.” They compare said businesses to museums, stating that the job of an art curator is to choose and display work that will “evoke an emotional response.” They go on to say that “we always respond emotionally to our experiences…so just like in museums, it’s the only focus that makes sense.” In the work place, the experience that both medical staff and their patients are a part of is “the soul – the beingness – of the organization,” and they continually “edit” that experience based on their choices regarding people and their “individual attitudes and actions,” processes, or “how things work or don’t work,” and finally, “the sensory environment.” Through this process, the sisters hope to “equip and empower everyone in the organization with insights to make more conscious and consistent choices on how they engage with others to create meaningful connections;” they want to “align all aspects of the business towards an emotional ‘end-frame.'” Basically, what I’m getting from all this and after reading the entire site, they strongly stress the idea of self-care, warning that business owner’s and their staff’s well-being will be reflected in their work. The curating aspect of their theories finally pokes its head out a little when they discuss the importance of awareness, stating that it is a process of “selectively directing your attention to specific aspects of what’s happening around you and being conscious of events, objects or patterns picked up by your senses and the impact those aspects have on how you are feeling.” In this way, we are able to successfully “curate” our experiences, and for those in healthcare, apparently that’s good news. 

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